My Jeep Never Looked Like This

 

esuvee6

Of course, I’m not a 16 year old who takes her Hummer flying. Can a giant LOW riding muppet convince kids not to drive their SUVs like Indy cars? Doubt it, since don’t drink/don’t smoke/don’t shag ads were meaningless to me except for their benchmark value when ignored, but good luck.


 

The ESUVEE Safety Campaign Frequently Asked Questions What is the ESUVEE Safety Campaign? The ESUVEE Safety Campaign is a $27 million, yearlong national education program designed to generate awareness of sport utility vehicle safety. A primary objective of the Campaign is to reduce SUV rollover incidences, particularly among younger male drivers. An additional $3 million will be allotted to an upcoming public service campaign through the Advertising Council.

What is the need for such a Campaign? Because SUVs are bigger, higher and heavier than cars, they require special handling. Their higher center of gravity makes them more top-heavy and prone to roll over. To decrease rollover incidences, the campaign aims to educate SUV owners and drivers of the vehicles’ unique handling and maintenance requirements. The campaign highlights critical tips for driving SUVs that can mean the difference between life and death: check your tire pressure monthly, don’t overload your SUV, always wear your seatbelt, avoid abrupt maneuvers, and don’t speed. The need for such a campaign takes on added urgency due to the increasing popularity of SUVs: currently, they account for one of every four vehicles on U.S. roads. In 2000, more than one-third of fatal SUV crashes involved rollovers, compared to only 15 percent in cars. And, despite these disturbing figures, more than four in 10 Americans think that they are safer in an SUV than in a regular car. Studies from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration show that, in New York alone, 1,522 people were killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2002. In the same year, there were 2,448 deaths and 58,000 injuries in the U.S. from SUV rollover crashes. Despite these alarming figures, four in 10 Americans feel safer in an SUV than in a passenger car.

What does the campaign hope to accomplish?By educating the public about the risks of SUVs in an engaging and compelling manner, the campaign aims to change driver behavior. Specifically, the campaign highlights critical tips for driving SUVs that can mean the difference between life and death: check your tire pressure monthly, don’t overload your SUV, always wear your seatbelt, avoid abrupt maneuvers, and don’t speed. Part of this approach is to introduce a new species of beast, ESUVEE, as the campaign’s mascot. This 16-foot long, 11-foot wide and 10-foot tall beast, unveiled on Jan. 31, appears prominently on the campaign’s web site, www.ESUVEE.com. ESUVEE will travel the country throughout 2005.

What are the main components of the campaign? The campaign consists of a variety of a hard-hitting advertising campaign including cinema, out-of-home, print, broadcast and online spots, strategic events and initiatives, such as ESUVEE Safety Days, where ESUVEE will make personal appearances. And the campaign Web site, ESUVEE.com, provides information and tips on SUV risks and safety in answer to the question, “How Do You Ride?”

Who is the campaign targeting?

While the campaign aims to educate everyone about the risks of SUVs, the main targets are male drivers between the ages of 18 and 34, because they are the most likely to be involved in rollovers. The question “How Do You Ride?” is meant to provoke SUV drivers and passengers to consider how to make themselves safer in an SUV.

How will the campaign reach its intended targets?

ESUVEE, the campaign mascot, is designed to evoke the sentiments one holds when they think of an actual sport utility vehicle: exciting, durable and powerful, with subtle characteristics. ESUVEE’s prominence on the web site and at SUV Safety Days will reinforce the message, while providing an entertaining, accessible and non-threatening method of capturing and retaining the intended audience’s attention.

Who is behind the campaign?

The 50 states and three jurisdictions are responsible for the campaign. It is overseen by an Executive Committee composed of representatives of the attorneys general of Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Tennessee, Texas and Washington, and the Governor’s Office of Consumer Affairs in Georgia.

How is the campaign funded?

The campaign’s $27 million cost is funded by a settlement that the 50 states and three jurisdictions reached with the Ford Motor Company in December 2002. The settlement resolved allegations of deceptive trade practices relating to the sales and advertising of Ford Sport Utility Vehicles.

Are some groups more prone to SUV crashes than others?

Yes. Younger drivers, defined as those between 16 and 24 years of age, account for approximately one quarter of SUV crashes. Drivers in this age group are also 68 percent more likely to roll over than older drivers. Furthermore, male drivers between the ages of 17 and 27 are almost two-and-a-half times more likely to die in an SUV accident than the national average.

What are some things to remember in preventing SUV rollover incidences?

The following critical tips for driving SUVs can mean the difference between life and death: check your tire pressure monthly, don’t overload your SUV, always wear your seatbelt, avoid abrupt maneuvers, and don’t speed. Learning how to handle, load and maintain an SUV properly and in accordance with the vehicle’s owner’s manual can reduce the risk of a rollover. In addition, wearing seatbelts significantly reduces the chance of fatalities in the event of a rollover. More details and illustrations about this are available on ESUVEE.com.

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